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Thursday, March 22, 2007

Yankee revue troupe in Seoul, 1930


Yankee Revue troupe's masquerade street parade
Chosun Ilbo, April 20, 1930. Drawing and text: Sôgyông(夕影) An Sôk-yông

Published in Modôn ppoi Kyôngsônhûl kônilda: Manmun manhwaro ponûn kûndaeûi ôlgul ("Modern boy strolling in Seoul: faces of modernity in illustrated newspaper columns") by Sin Myông-jik. (Hyônsilmunhwayôn'gu, 2003)

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Comments to note "Yankee revue troupe in Seoul, 1930" (Comments to posts older than 14 days are moderated)

<Anonymous Anonymous> said on 23.3.07 : 

I love it! How did you happen to come across this? So, this is an American troupe in Seoul... what brought them here? I'd love to know more. Thanks for sharing it!

<Blogger Antti Leppänen> said on 28.3.07 : 

This is from Modôn ppoi Kyôngsônhûl kônilda ("Modern boy strolling in Seoul") a book by Sin Myông-jik depicting the arrival of modernity in Korea at the time of Japanese colonial era through this kind of manmun manhwa illustrated newspaper columns.


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