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Friday, June 03, 2005

cold noodles

이렇게 세상이 좋아졌다. World has truly become a better place, for would it have been possible to enjoy naengmyôn over here before? What would we be eating if the Asian food stores wouldn't be catering for us? You don't want to hear, and I don't want to tell you. This is naengmyôn: buckwheat (tattari in Finnish) noodles with spinach namul, kimchi, some toenjang tchigae, and a fried egg. (A package of naengmyôn in a store here is 5.20€ (6.25$), fair considered the circumstances.)(This posting has been inspired by Delicious Biting.)

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Comments to note "cold noodles" (Comments to posts older than 14 days are moderated)

<Blogger kotaji> said on 3.6.05 : 

That's making me seriously hungry (and I've just eaten). What's the stuff next to the tubu, with some koch'ujang on it?

<Blogger kotaji> said on 3.6.05 : 

It's reminded me to buy some buckwheat noodles as I really like them but haven't eaten them for ages. You mostly get the Japanese-style soba here, but they don't seem to be any different to Korean ones to me.

Although the ones you get in soup naengmyon are completely different. Aren't they made of koguma or something?

<Blogger june cho> said on 5.6.05 : 

Is it available in LA?


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