<$BlogRSDURL$>
Reading

Hannu Salama: Kosti Herhiläisen perunkirjoitus
Flickr photographs
www.flickr.com
More of my Flickr photos
∙ Current position: Academy of Finland Postdoctoral Researcher, Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Helsinki
∙ Ph.D. dissertation Neighborhood Shopkeepers in Contemporary South Korea: Household, Work, and Locality available online (E-Thesis publications a the University of Helsinki). For printed copies, please contact me by e-mail.
Contact ∙ Personal
cellularmailmy del.icio.us bookmarks
my photographs at Flickr
Anthropology at U. of Helsinki
Finnish Anthropological Society
Powered by Blogger

Anthropology, Korean studies and that

Savage Minds
Keywords
Golublog
photoethnography
antropologi.info
Solongseeyoutomorrow
Constructing Amusement
Otherwise
Frog in a Well

Often visited

The Marmot's Hole Gusts Of Popular FeelingSanchon Hunjang Mark RussellLanguage hatMuninngyuhang.netSedisKemppinenJokisipiläPanun palsta
Weblog Commenting and Trackback by HaloScan.com


Google this blog
Download Hangul Viewer 2002
Download Hangul Office Viewer 2007

Tuesday, November 08, 2005

women's earnings, and men

Chosun Ilbo reported a research report from Korean Labor Institute (KLI) that wive's economic power in comparison to their husbands is constantly increasing so that at the moment in one out of five families in which both spouses work the woman earns more than the man. The Chosun article doesn't quote the research any more than that, and presents instead examples and trends which are likely to arouse human interest, like women busy in their activities leaving their husbands alone at home to wait for a meal in vain. The example of a couple in which the hairdressing shop keeper woman earns more than her husband cannot be nothing new - that was also what I encountered during my fieldwork (and what I presented about in a conference last summer and write about in my thesis). Especially hairdressing has been a profession in which the woman likely earns more than her husband: even in a normal case a hairdressing shop provides a fairly good income, and hairdressers are not likely to get married with well-earning men. (Well, the husband of one of the hairdressers that I acquainted during my research earned only 1/4 of her husband's income at the time they got married, but when I learned to know her, the husband drove a cab she had purchased.)

The Chosun article presents situations in which the low-earning husband has no more any say in the household matters; as I said, that's a human-interest point of view, while in practice the situation may be more balanced as well. The well-earning self-employed women do have their assertiveness and somewhat belittling attitude towards their husbands, but not in their (and my) presence, when the men's and women's roles are let's say better preserved.

The research that inspired the article by Chosun was article ‘기혼여성의 경제적 지위’ (direct link to the article as pdf; "The economic position of married women") by Hwang Su-gyeong in the September 2005 issue of Nodong Review, published monthly by KLI.

Categories at del.icio.us/hunjang:

Comments to note "women's earnings, and men" (Comments to posts older than 14 days are moderated)

<Blogger hardyandtiny> said on 10.11.05 : 

Interesting observations.

"The Chosun article presents situations in which the low-earning husband has no more any say in the household matters; as I said, that's a human-interest point of view, while in practice the situation may be more balanced as well. The well-earning self-employed women do have their assertiveness and somewhat belittling attitude towards their husbands, but not in their (and my) presence, when the men's and women's roles are let's say better preserved."

We ALL have our ups and downs in society.
Im not sure if these accepted roles haven't ALWAYS had their hidden percentage that worked out to the a woman in charge.

I don't see you are pointing out a trend and I make no argument - just an observation

I wonder if it has always been the same percentage in personal relationships and if we have become more aware of the percentage due to an unavoidable exposure?

<Blogger hardyandtiny> said on 10.11.05 : 

whoa
sorry, should have spell checked it
sorry

Im not sure if accepted roles have not ALWAYS had their hidden percentages, finding women "in charge".

Not an argument-just an observation

The percentage of female dominated households may not have changed over time. There may be something that caused their exposure.

sorry my first post was drunk


Write a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link